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Lot Number: 160
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1861 Confederate Legislator’s Important Pro-Union Speech Thomas N Crumpler of N.C. Argues AGAINST Secession

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1861-Dated Civil War Era, 1st Edition Pamphlet titled, “Speech of T. N. Crumpler, of Ashe (North Carolina), On FEDERAL RELATIONS”, (Thomas N. Crumpler argues strenuously AGAINST Secession, he was later killed in a Civil War battle on July 11, 1862), printed at the Office of the Raleigh Register, in Raleigh, North Carolina, Very Fine.

This was an important Speech given by Thomas N. Crumpler to the House of Commons of North Carolina on January 10, 1861. North Carolina joined the Confederacy during the Civil War, so one is likely to assume that this speech was in favor of secession. Actually, the opposite is true. This 16-page Imprint has its original stitched binding and measures 8-3/4” x 5-3/8” with self covers, printed at the Office of the Raleigh Register, in Raleigh, North Carolina. There is a small water stain on the bottom right corner of the cover and some small minor stains on the last few pages; otherwise, this is in very nice condition. In his speech, Crumpler argues strenuously AGAINST Secession. Rather, he encouraged his fellow legislators to exhaust every means possible to remain united with the North, preferring instead a diplomatic or a political solution. Crumpler saw the dangers and states, in part:

“I do not care to speak of that day, when we shall look at every comer as the messenger of evil tidings, of that day when the mother as she hears the wind sigh around her dwelling, and rattle at the casement, will clasp her infant to her bosom in pale dread of the ruffian’s touch and the assassin’s knife.”

Original printed wrappers. Light tone and some humidity stains to outer wraps, with a choice Very Fine and clean interior. Crumpler, a lawyer, served in the North Carolina House of Commons in 1860. An eloquent speaker, Crumpler here pleads for the preservation of the Union, blaming the spit in the Democratic party in allowing the election of President Abraham Lincoln. When President Lincoln called for troops after the fall of Fort Sumter, the tide turned in this western North Carolina district. Crumpler enlisted as a Confederate Cavalry officer in July 1861. Crumpler was a Captain in Company A, 1st Cavalry (9th Regiment of the North Carolina State Troops) and was later promoted to Major. He was wounded on June 29, 1862, while performing reconnaissance around McClellan's Army. Crumpler fell during a cavalry charge and died from wounds suffered at Willis's Church, Virginia on July 11, 1862, at the age of twenty-seven.
Excerpt from Speech of T. N. Crumpler, of Ashe, on Federal Relations: Delivered in the House of Commons, Jan. 10, 1861:

“But, Mr. Chairman, it must not be supposed that I hold the disunionists, even the disunionists per se, to be the only persons responsible for the evils that are upon us. There is another class - the Abolitionists of the North - who are primarily re sponsible and most guilty in this matter. With hearts full of treason to the Spirit of the Constitution, they have, for years, been digging at the foundation of our Government. Filled themselves with all that is pestilent, they are and have been, the. Leprous Spot upon'our body politic. Enemies of our coun try, they deserve execration. Their mischievous and wicked acts, while benefiting neither themselves or the objects of their hypocritical sympathies, have furnished the disunionists with the materials for their plot against the Union. It remains to be seen whether or not we are to become the victims of this plot. Are the people of North Carolina, whose representatives we are, prepared to carry out, the disunion programme? I am satisfied that they are not. It is true that, at the beginning of the ses sion, we had some manifestations of disunion sentiment from the towns and villages where combustible materials are most easily gathered and excitements most readily manufactured, but I knew that it was as the glare of the meteor which for a mo~ ment. Lights up the sky and attracts our gaze from the myriads of stars which hold their places and shine with beneficent light upon the earth. I knew that when the masses of the people waked up and spoke, when we heard from the plough-handles and axe-helves, we should hear a different language; and we are beginning to hear/it in their remonstrances against being committed to disunion, which are daily laid before our body.”



Thomas N. Crumpler (ca. 1835-11 July 1862) entered the University of North Carolina in 1851 but did not graduate. He was a lawyer in Jefferson, North Carolina, and served as a Whig member of the North Carolina House of Commons in 1860. An eloquent speaker, Crumpler was a captain in Company A, 1st Cavalry (9th Regiment of the North Carolina State Troops) and was later promoted to major. He was wounded on June 29, 1862, while performing reconnaissance around McClellan's Army. Crumpler and many others fell during a cavalry charge up a long lane toward an artillery and infantry emplacement. He died on July 11, 1862, at the age of twenty-seven.
Lot Number: 160
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Estimate Range: $600 - $800
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