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Lot Number: 288
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Exceptional “The Woman’s Bible / Editor Elizabeth Cady Stanton” 1925 Printed Anti-Woman’s Suffrage Broadside

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c. 1920, Printed Broadside, “The Woman’s Bible / Editor Elizabeth Cady Stanton / Carrie Chapman Catt, President of the National Suffrage Association, one of the revising committee.”, a.k.a. by Elizabeth Stanton, (prior President of the National Woman Suffrage Association), never folded, Choice Crisp Near Mint.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) was an American writer and Activist who was a leader of the Women's Rights movement in the U.S. during the mid- to late-19th century. She was the main force behind the 1848 “Seneca Falls Convention”, the first convention to be called for the sole purpose of discussing Women's Rights, and was the primary author of its “Declaration of Sentiments”. Her demand for Women's Right to Vote generated a controversy at the convention but quickly became a central tenet of the Women's movement. She was also active in other social reform activities, especially Abolitionism. This is an exceptional fresh vivid crisp quality Printed Broadside, measuring about 9.5” x 16.5”. Her primary concern became the responsibility of established religion for woman's inferior position.

In 1895 and 1898 Stanton published successive volumes of an astringent critique of the Old Testament, called The Woman's Bible, consisting of a detailed analysis of Biblical passages derogatory to woman. There was strong opposition to the work among suffragists at the suffrage convention of 1896 passed a resolution explicitly disavowing any responsibility for The Woman's Bible, which was in effect a sharp rebuff to the old leader [Flexner, p. 220]. Stanton continued writing the critique until her death in 1902. Here, her commentary is focused:

“The Woman’s Bible” and the Anti-Christian beliefs of Suffragists. The author pulls direct quotes from the publication; “That even the most enlightened nations are not yet out of barbarism is due to the teachings of the Bible...”, “No institution in modern civilization is so tyrannical and so unjust to woman as is the Christian Church,...” “The Bible has been and will continue to be a stumbling block in the way of the truest civilization...” The author closes out with, “This is the teaching of National Suffrage Leaders. Are you willing for women who hold these views to become political powers in our country?”

Two fine hidden 2” tears along the lower edge, overall vividly and boldly printed in deep black on a light tan vintage sheet. Outstanding eye appeal for display. A rare historic Woman’s Rights and Vote related Broadside.


Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 - October 26, 1902) was an American writer and activist who was a leader of the women's rights movement in the U.S. during the mid- to late-19th century.

She was the main force behind the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, the first convention to be called for the sole purpose of discussing women's rights, and was the primary author of its Declaration of Sentiments. Her demand for women's right to vote generated a controversy at the convention but quickly became a central tenet of the women's movement. She was also active in other social reform activities, especially abolitionism.

In 1851, she met Susan B. Anthony and formed a decades-long partnership that was crucial to the development of the women's rights movement. During the American Civil War, they established the Women's Loyal National League to campaign for the abolition of slavery, and they led it in the largest petition drive in U.S. history up to that time. They started a newspaper called The Revolution in 1868 to work for women's rights.

After the war, Stanton and Anthony were the main organizers of the American Equal Rights Association, which campaigned for equal rights for both African Americans and women, especially the right of suffrage.

When the Fifteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was introduced that would provide suffrage for black men only, they opposed it, insisting that suffrage should be extended to all African Americans and all women at the same time. Others in the movement supported the amendment, resulting in a split. During the bitter arguments that led up to the split, Stanton sometimes expressed her ideas in elitist and racially condescending language. In her opposition to the voting rights of African Americans Cady was quoted to have said, "It becomes a serious question whether we had better stand aside and let 'Sambo' walk into the kingdom first."

Frederick Douglass, an abolitionist friend who had escaped from slavery, reproached her for such remarks.

Stanton became the president of the National Woman Suffrage Association, which she and Anthony created to represent their wing of the movement. When the split was healed more than twenty years later, Stanton became the first president of the united organization, the National American Woman Suffrage Association. This was largely an honorary position; Stanton continued to work on a wide range of women's rights issues despite the organization's increasingly tight focus on women's right to vote.

Stanton was the primary author of the first three volumes of the History of Woman Suffrage, a massive effort to record the history of the movement, focusing largely on her wing of it. She was also the primary author of The Woman's Bible, a critical examination of the Bible that is based on the premise that its attitude toward women reflects prejudice from a less civilized age.
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Lot Number: 288
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Estimate Range: $600 - $800
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