You are NOT SIGNED IN.  •  CLICK HERE to SIGN-IN
Signing-In will EXPEDITE the Make-An-Offer process.
Table of Contents >> Autographs >>
Item #110325Price: $395.00Add to Cart
Please... Only Serious Offers Will Be Considered
Your BEST OFFER:  * required 
First Name:  * required 
Middle Name:
Last Name:  * required 
Company:
Address:  * required 
City:  * required 
State:  * required 
Zip Code:  * required 
Country:  * required 
Home Phone Number:
Work Phone Number:
Cell Phone Number:
Fax Phone Number:
Email Address:  * required 
Additional Message:
 Click to Submit Your Offer
<< PreviousNext >>
1805 "Three Day Note" Signed by Stephen Girard
STEPHEN GIRARD (1750-1831). Banker, he personally saved the U.S. government from financial collapse during the War of 1812, one of the wealthiest people in America, estimated the fourth richest American of all time.
May 19/22, 1805-Dated, Bank of Pennsylvania "Three Day Note", Signed by Stephen Girard, Crisp Extremely Fine. This $3000 note, due May 19/25, 1805, 'At the Bank of Pennsylvania' and is Signed by Stephen Girard. Watermarked paper, pin hole just above the word "due" minor spotting. This was a 3-Day Note, perhaps to cover a draft. Only example we have seen. Ex. EAHA 7/24/94, lot 585.
Stephen Girard (May 20, 1750 " December 26, 1831; born tienne Girard) was a French-born, naturalized American, philanthropist and banker.

He personally saved the U.S. government from financial collapse during the War of 1812, and became one of the wealthiest people in America, estimated to have been the fourth richest American of all time, based on the ratio of his fortune to contemporary GDP.

After the charter for the First Bank of the United States expired in 1811, Girard purchased most of its stock as well as the building and its furnishings on South Third Street in Philadelphia and opened his own bank, variously known as "Girard's Bank," or as "Girard Bank." or also as "Stephen Girard's Bank" or even the "Bank of Stephen Girard." Girard was the sole proprietor of his bank, and thus avoided the Pennsylvania state law which prohibited an unincorporated association of persons from establishing a bank, and required a charter from the legislature for a banking corporation.

Girard hired George Simpson, the cashier of the First Bank, as cashier of the new bank, and with seven other employees, opened for business on May 18, 1812. He allowed the Trustees of the First Bank of the United States to use some offices and space in the vaults to continue the process of winding down the affairs of the closed bank at a very nominal rent.[9]

Girard's Bank was a principal source of government credit during the War of 1812. Towards the end of the war, when the financial credit of the U.S. government was at its lowest, Girard placed nearly all of his resources at the disposal of the government and underwrote up to 95 percent of the war loan issue, which enabled the United States to carry on the war.

After the war, he became a large stockholder in and one of the directors of the Second Bank of the United States. Girard's bank became the Girard Trust Company, and later Girard Bank. It merged with Mellon Bank in 1983, and was largely sold to Citizens Bank two decades later. Its monumental headquarters building still stands at Broad and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia.

Childless, he devoted much of his fortune to philanthropy, particularly the education and welfare of orphans. His legacy is still felt in his adopted home of Philadelphia.
Table of Contents >> Autographs >>
Item #110325Price: $395.00Add to Cart
<< PreviousNext >>